Improving the Lives of Rehabilitation Patients

Research is core to California Rehabilitation Institute’s mission of advancing patient care. Our goal is to recognize challenges, innovate and evaluate new treatments that improve the lives of rehabilitation patients. We do this through studies, performed during admission to California Rehabilitation Institute or after discharge.

Active research studies

Below is a listing of our active research studies. If you, a loved one or your patient meets the eligibility requirements, please reach out to the contact listed below.

  • Stroke

    The Relationship Between Function, Stroke Severity and Perception of Health at Follow-up in Stroke Rehabilitation Patients

    This retrospective study focuses on patients 18 years and older who have a stroke diagnoses and have been discharged from California Rehabilitation Institute from June 1, 2019 - Dec. 31, 2020. The study aims include determining the relationship between function, stroke severity and perceived health status in this population and the factors that predict favorable health status.

    Contact: Cecile Alpasan
    Email: [email protected]
    Phone: 310-423-5243

     


     

    3D-Printed Customized Grip Assistance Device for Improved ADL in Acute Stroke/Neurological Injury and Spinal Cord Injury Patients

    We are looking for adults (18+) with grip impairment to test a new grip assistance device. This device aims to help with activities of daily living and improve grip. The study will take place in the comfort of your room!

    Eligibility criteria: 18+ years old, impaired grip from stroke, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury or related condition.

    Contact: Sean Pianka
    Email: [email protected]
    Phone: 516-361-6148

     


     

    A Clinical-Research Network to Identify Spatial Disorders after Brain Injury and Improve the Quality of Rehabilitation Care

    The purpose of this study is Identification of spatial neglect patients, who are at risk of poor outcomes and incur greater care cost, can help target initiatives to improve quality care, benefiting the stroke survivor and our society cost-efficiently.

    The study procedures have three parts (Aims):

    1. We will track the use of three neuroscience-based clinical assessments in the inpatient rehabilitation setting
      • the Kessler Foundation Neglect Assessment Process (Chen et al., 2012; Chen et al., 2015) to administer the Catherine Bergego Scale, a functional performance evaluation that is valid and reliable to use to screen for spatial neglect
      • spatial-motor flexibility (SMF) measured by a simple clicking task
      • truncal leaning and postural asymmetry, measured by a simple transfer board sitting task
    2. We will examine the predictive value of these measures, contrasted with a functional performance assessment (the Functional Independence Measure), to project length of stay, the occurrence of falls during inpatient rehabilitation, and discharge disposition after leaving the inpatient rehabilitation setting. All of these outcomes are collected by the clinical sites as part of their internal, administrative
      monitoring of care outcomes and quality.
    3. We will examine how many patients with spatial neglect symptoms are treated for neglect after they are identified, as part of usual and standard care, and whether they received the KF-PAT (prism adaptation training).
    Contact: Aimee Davis
    Email: [email protected]
    Phone: 424-522-7862

     

     

  • Brain Injury

    3D-Printed Customized Grip Assistance Device for Improved ADL in Acute Stroke/Neurological Injury and Spinal Cord Injury Patients

    We are looking for adults (18+) with grip impairment to test a new grip assistance device. This device aims to help with activities of daily living and improve grip. The study will take place in the comfort of your room!

    Eligibility criteria: 18+ years old, impaired grip from stroke, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury or related condition.

    Contact: Sean Pianka
    Email: [email protected]
    Phone: 516-361-6148

     


     

    A Clinical-Research Network to Identify Spatial Disorders after Brain Injury and Improve the Quality of Rehabilitation Care

    The purpose of this study is Identification of spatial neglect patients, who are at risk of poor outcomes and incur greater care cost, can help target initiatives to improve quality care, benefiting the stroke survivor and our society cost-efficiently.

    The study procedures have three parts (Aims):

    1. We will track the use of three neuroscience-based clinical assessments in the inpatient rehabilitation setting
      • the Kessler Foundation Neglect Assessment Process (Chen et al., 2012; Chen et al., 2015) to administer the Catherine Bergego Scale, a functional performance evaluation that is valid and reliable to use to screen for spatial neglect
      • spatial-motor flexibility (SMF) measured by a simple clicking task
      • truncal leaning and postural asymmetry, measured by a simple transfer board sitting task
    2. We will examine the predictive value of these measures, contrasted with a functional performance assessment (the Functional Independence Measure), to project length of stay, the occurrence of falls during inpatient rehabilitation, and discharge disposition after leaving the inpatient rehabilitation setting. All of these outcomes are collected by the clinical sites as part of their internal, administrative
      monitoring of care outcomes and quality.
    3. We will examine how many patients with spatial neglect symptoms are treated for neglect after they are identified, as part of usual and standard care, and whether they received the KF-PAT (prism adaptation training).
    Contact: Aimee Davis
    Email: [email protected]
    Phone: 424-522-7862

     

     

  • Neurological

    3D-Printed Customized Grip Assistance Device for Improved ADL in Acute Stroke/Neurological Injury and Spinal Cord Injury Patients

    We are looking for adults (18+) with grip impairment to test a new grip assistance device. This device aims to help with activities of daily living and improve grip. The study will take place in the comfort of your room!

    Eligibility criteria: 18+ years old, impaired grip from stroke, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury or related condition.

    Contact: Sean Pianka
    Email: [email protected]
    Phone: 516-361-6148

     


     

    3D Kinematic Analysis of Human Movements

    Understanding the movement patterns of patients with neurological diseases is important to inventing new cures. Such movements are currently evaluated by generating scores using simple scales, but this approach is problematic because such scales do not reflect the details of the true state of the movement quality. Accurately determining the quality of movements is important, as doing so provides unforeseen information on the current state of recovery from injury or on progression of a disease. This study will examine how such a determination can be improved by using kinematic analysis, which will study by utilizing a stereo-camera system to video record human subjects as they perform arm movements.

    Contact: Dr. Ahmet Arac
    Email: [email protected]

     

  • Spinal Cord Injury

    3D-Printed Customized Grip Assistance Device for Improved ADL in Acute Stroke/Neurological Injury and Spinal Cord Injury Patients

    We are looking for adults (18+) with grip impairment to test a new grip assistance device. This device aims to help with activities of daily living and improve grip. The study will take place in the comfort of your room!

    Eligibility criteria: 18+ years old, impaired grip from stroke, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury or related condition.

    Contact: Sean Pianka
    Email: [email protected]
    Phone: 516-361-6148

     

  • COVID-19

    Post-COVID Inpatient Rehabilitation Outcomes: Highlighting Similarities and Differences in Demographics and Functional Outcomes

    This study will provide a descriptive analysis of COVID-19 patients treated within 12 inpatient rehabilitation facilities across the United States. This information will provide important evidence to guide inpatient rehabilitation facilities across a wide range of populations and geographic locations.

    Aims:

    • To examine the effect of patient characteristics such as age, gender, race, ethnicity, marital status and geographic location on patients who are Recovered COVID-19 compared to the general rehabilitation outcomes.
    • To explore the rehabilitation diagnostic distribution and outcomes of patients with Recovered COVID-19.
    • To investigate rehabilitation trajectories (no improvement, some improvement and significant improvement) on the self-care and mobility functional outcomes for the Recovered COVID-19 population versus general rehabilitation population.

    Contact: Pamela Roberts
    Email: [email protected]
    Phone: 310-423-6660

     

  • Other Research Studies

    Sensing in At Risk Populations: Monitoring Performance Status, Activity of Daily Living, and Independence to Promote Safe Outcomes for Elderly Patients in Rehab, the Home, and Long Term Care

    SARP is a UCLA research project being conducted at California Rehabilitation Institute. The SARP system aims to gauge the wellbeing and independence level of elderly patients living at home, at-risk of functional decline. The SARP system harnesses the metrics achieved from the Smart Watch (activity) and sensors (indoor localization) to track its user’s activity. The system’s ultimate goal is to predict improvement and decline in patients to alert caregivers and doctors and prevent hospitalization.

    Email: [email protected]
    Phone: 310-794-0989

     


     

    A Multicenter RCT of Pharmacist-Directed Transitional Care to Reduce Post-Hospitalization Utilization

    After being hospitalized, our nation’s large and growing population of older adult patients is often harmed by medication errors. This project will study known methods of reducing medication errors, especially by involving pharmacists. The goal of this project is to create new knowledge that makes it easier for more hospitals and health systems to use these methods, so that they can reduce harm caused by medication errors.

    Contact: Dr. Josh Pevnick
    Email: [email protected]
    Phone: 206-792-6948

     

Any questions?
If you have questions or need additional information, please contact us.